Heart Rhythm Conditions

Online Patient Education Library

Our team of cardiologists and staff strive to improve the overall health of our patients by focusing on preventing, diagnosing and treating heart problems. Please use our patient education library to learn more about the services we offer and the conditions we treat. If you have questions or need to schedule an appointment, contact us.

 

Useful Links

The Web has a wealth of information on various topics that pertain to your health.  Listed below are some websites that are great places to start to look for information on various health-related topics.

Prescription and Non-Prescription Drug Information:

Cancer Resources:

Cardiovascular Disease Resources:

Osteoporosis Resources:

Arthritis Resources:

Diabetes Resources:

General Health Resources:

Pet Therapy

In addition, I would like to recommend a few sites on the value of pet therapy.  

“Research studies have shown that pets or companion animals are beneficial to people, including the elderly.  These studies have concluded that all types of pets provide older persons with a sense of emotional and physical security; an opportunity for exchanges of affection; distraction from ones own problems; compensation for sensory loss; satisfaction of the need to touch and be touched, to smile and to laugh; a decrease in depression; and the incorporation of rhythm and structure into daily routine.  The animals seem to provide a boundless measure of acceptance, adoration, attention and unconditional love.”

-Quoted from the April 2002 issue (Vol. 10, No. 4) of Clinical Geriatrics, “The Therapeutic Use of Companion Animals,” by Antonios Likourezos, MA, MPH, Orah R. Burack, MA, and Melinda S. Lantz, MD

 

 

 

 

Heart rhythm conditions are often a sign of an underlying issue, and may even pose problems in themselves. So what are some of the most common heart rhythm conditions?

Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation (AF) occurs when the atria, or upper chambers of the heart, begin to beat out of sync with the ventricles, or lower chambers of the heart. Characterized by a rapid rhythm, AF reduces the heart's effectiveness at pumping blood. As a result, blood clots can form in the heart chambers, potentially reaching the brain and causing a stroke or heart failure.

AF is typically due to an existing heart condition. Other causes include high blood pressure, heart attack and coronary artery disease. Dizziness, feeling out of breath, tiredness, a feeling that the heart is racing or fluttering, uneven heartbeat, and chest pain are all common symptoms.

Atrial fibrillation is common in older adults and may not present obvious symptoms. Seeing a doctor at the first onset of AF symptoms is important to avoid serious complications. The typical goals of treatment are restoring rhythm to as close to normal as possible and preventing the formation of blood clots.

Arrhythmia

Arrhythmia is a problem with the rhythm of the heartbeat-beating too fast, too slow, or with an irregular rhythm. Many arrhythmias are harmless, but some can be life­-threatening, especially since a lack of blood flow to the body can damage the brain, heart and other organs.

Noticeable symptoms of arrhythmia include fainting, dizziness, heart palpitations, weakness, fatigue, shortness of breath and chest pain. Arrhythmia can be caused by heart disease, stress, smoking, heavy alcohol use and certain medications.

Treatment for arrhythmias depends on the type and severity of irregular heart rhythm. In most cases, people with arrhythmias can live normal, healthy lives, but never take the risk of a 'wait-and­-see' approach.

Remember, anything other than your usual, steady heartbeat could be a sign of a dangerous heart condition. Always discuss irregular heartbeat symptoms with your cardiologist.


Contact Us

For questions and appointment requests,
please call our office at (505) 661-8900.

 

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Office Hours

Monday: 8am-6pm(last walk-in patient at 5:45pm)
Tuesday: 8am-6pm(last walk-in patient at 5:45pm)
Wednesday: 8am-6pm(last walk-in patient at 5:45pm)
Thursday: 8am-6pm(last walk-in patient at 5:45pm)
Friday: 8am-6pm(last walk-in patient at 5:45pm)
Saturday: 8am-2pm(last walk-in patient at 1:45pm)
Sunday:  Closed